The Types of Habits

From the moment we’re born, we learn habits that may stay with us for the rest of our lives. From the way we talk, to the things we do every day, our lives are littered with habits that more often than not, we are not even aware of.

In the world of self-perfection, where most of us live, we often hear, want to or try to “foster better habits”. Basically, change our existing habits or behaviours to fit in or make our own (or others’) life a little bit easier. Not a bad intention, but…

Not every habit is a bad one (like smoking, nail-biting or drinking too much coffee) that ruins our health or life and should be changed. Every one of us has habits that are already healthy and help us to live life happier and healthier, like brushing our teeth in the morning and washing our hands after we’ve been to the toilet. Some habits are just neutral, like the brand of coffee you drink every day or the route you take to work. These are the most precious because they make us unique, our decision making easier and our life brighter. So, think carefully if you really need that change.

Maybe, all you need is just to figure out what is that you are doing as a habit, why you are doing that and let those around you know about “your ways”. It might make everyone’s life easier without too much effort and sacrifice on your side. To help you with that self-discovery we’ve identified eight of the most common categories of habits.

Good-rules - type - thinking

Belief Habits

These are the attitudes and perceptions we hold of the world around us. It includes how we react to things as well as our prejudices and bias. You might assume that teenagers are likely to behave in a particular way, or that women can be more nurturing than men.

Good-rules - type - strategy

Strategy Habits

Strategy habits are how we use our problem-solving skills and cope with situations – good and bad! These habits can have a positive or negative impact on our lives. For example, your habit of playing it by ear might frustrate someone who’s naturally a forward planner.

Good rules - type - physical

Physical Habits

The ways that you sit, stand, walk, speak and laugh are all habitual. People easily notice these habits and comment on the way you always say something or the look you get on your face when thinking of something in particular.

Good-rules - type - timing

Timing Habits

These are the attitudes and perceptions we hold of the world around us. It includes how we react to things as well as our prejudices and bias. You might assume that teenagers are likely to behave in a particular way, or that women can be more nurturing than men.

Good-rules - type - power

Power Habits

Power habits are the behaviours you demonstrate around status, territory or power. You may think, for example, that someone is not as important as you because of the job they have, or where they live, or how much they earn.

Good-rules - type - emotional

Emotional Habits

These are habits that are triggered by an emotional response to specific person, situation, place, activity or else. You may feel happy when you enjoy a glass of wine, for example, or sad when you overindulge at a buffet.

Good-rules - type - relationship

Relationship Habits

Your human interaction is habitual. Relationship habits denote how you behave around others. You may like to be the centre of attention, or you may be shy in large groups of people. Your may treat strangers with attention and kindness or suspicion and skepticism.

We bet you remembered at least one “sticky” habit of yours in each category while reading this list. Not all of them are so bad, right?